Benefits-of-Having-a-Termite-Inspection

Benefits To Having a Termite Inspection

Termites are a very big problem to home owners. They’re almost invisible, completely quiet and have the potential to cause extensive damage before a homeowner ever recognizes that they have a problem. Termites are active in 49 of the 50 states (Alaska is too cold to sustain them), and cause more than $50 billion in property damage every year.  You can imagine that there are a great many benefits to having a termite inspection on the home you are considering purchasing.  Let us tell you what they are.

How-To-Get-Rid-Of-Stinkbugs

How To Get Rid Of Stinkbugs

Stink bugs feel like nature’s revenge for every insect you’ve ever squished. They get their name from the foul stench they release when they’re threatened or disturbed. It’s a smell that’s tough to describe. Notes of dirty socks, rotting fruit and paper-mill pulp. In short, it stinks — and worse, it lingers. If you have…

A-Summer-That-Bites

Mosquito Time – A Summer That Bites

I think we’ve all heard the phrase, “the bees knees”, but do we know what the heck it means?  Yes, I know this is supposed to be a blog about actual pests and not idioms about their knees, but hey, we all have to have our fun!  Let’s find out what the origin of “the bees knees” is and how it has buzzed it’s way into several different countries over the years.  We might even get into the “cat’s pajamas” while we’re at it!

Bees Knees

I think we’ve all heard the phrase, “the bees knees”, but do we know what the heck it means?  Yes, I know this is supposed to be a blog about actual pests and not idioms about their knees, but hey, we all have to have our fun!  Let’s find out what the origin of “the bees knees” is and how it has buzzed it’s way into several different countries over the years.  We might even get into the “cat’s pajamas” while we’re at it!

history-of-the-mosquito

History of the Mosquito

She’s less than a quarter-inch long, has six legs, and has been a BIG TIME disease spreader thoughout history and world wide. The female mosquito is devious and diabolical, and she uses scent to find us and is attracted by the lactic acid and other ingredients in our perspiration. She also senses the carbon dioxide in our exhalations and follows the slipstream back to our faces. So how did this bug get so far in the world?